The Athenians Allochiria pour on us fifty minutes of controlled rage based on post metal sludge of surprising quality, capable of lining up many of the successive releases in the sector in recent times. Active for about five years and with only one self-titled ep to their credit dating back to 2010, the Hellenic group makes its long-distance debut with Omonoia, a genuine gem devoid of weak points, composed and played with an urgency and freshness rarely found. Capable of switching with extreme fluidity from moments consisting of liquid post-metal-like openings to caliginous sludge outbursts, all amalgamated by skillful atmospheric intervals, Allochiria captivate and captivate with this alternation of moods, well represented by the opener Today Will Die Tomorrow, which opens with a cultured quote from Wiliam S. Burroughs recited on an acoustic basis by a female voice; the same, by the very talented Irene, in the last two minutes of the song and in the rest of the record mercilessly assaults our ear auricles, spewing all the frustration well summed up in a title such as the one that closes the album, Humanity Is False (a song in which ours, moreover, manage to convey, albeit in a transfigured way, typically Mediterranean musical aromas). Although the inevitable juxtapositions with Neurosis, Pelican and company will flow in the review, functional in any case to describe the sound that characterizes Omonoia, forget the sterile sense of impotence and incompleteness that not infrequently grips releases of this genre: Allochiria have a lot to say, and they do it with the personality that belongs only to the greats; if some label’s talent scout had any intention of finding some up-and-coming band on which to seriously bet for the near future, then turn his gaze toward that Greece where, evidently, the economic crisis, as well as in the other countries of the Mediterranean area, seems to have provoked by contrast the growth and development of new artistic expressions, musical and otherwise.

2014 – Independent