Demetra Sine Die – A Quiet Land Of Fear

There are human creations that do not grow old, but rather with time allow them to be seen and understood from different points of view not possible in the immediacy of the creative act. This is the case with A Quiet Land Of Fear, the 2012 album by Demetra Sine Die, an above-average Genoese band in terms of creativity and musical performance. One of the members is Marco Paddeu, whom you can hear on Morgengruss and Sepvlcrvm, one of the best musicians and masterminds in Italian music in recent years. In cahoots with Adriano Magliocco and Marco Fattore, he gave birth to this beautiful record in 2012, which still sounds great four years later, in fact it is even brighter. Inside this record are fantastic insights, and different ways of reading heavy music, and the presence of a unique and special way of making music that captures the heart of the listener. Demetra Sine Die play music that pulsates, starting from a grunge and post-metal base, and also moving on to make excellent rock other than that, always with a design and an enveloping force, and above all a lot of poetry. A Quiet Land Of Fear is a precise portrait of what we, breathing deeply, call life. Fear is a prime mover, it moves this shell of rocks, for as Lovecraft well understood, we are specks in the eyes of something greater than ourselves. And so this record takes on a soundtrack contour of the moments before the apocalypse, where we will burn within the sun, as the last track explains. Demetra Sine Die are in no hurry, there doesn’t have to be one, as they put together a sound grid, carefully crafted down to the smallest detail, where everything slowly comes together. Every note on the record is distilled, and has meaning, there is the creation of music as the positive negative of silence, which is the most precious antimatter. The Genoese band is a liquor that comes in and warms you up, giving you the energy you need to face the day of wrath. A Quiet Land Of Fear is a masterpiece that four years later is still fantastic and fits even better into the poetics of musical minds we should hold on to. (M.Argo – MetalEyes 23/9/2016)

2016 – Independent