Obseqvies‘ debut album brings the best melodic and atmospheric funeral doom back to the forefront. Little or nothing is known about this band, except that they come from Finland, which is a sort of guarantee when it comes to this genre, in addition to the not irrelevant presence of Daniel Neagoe on vocals: the natural consequence can only be to entrust the music with the task of telling the listeners the umpteenth painful chapter of a story that always finds new life and magnificent performers, despite its laughable commercial appeal. The Hours Of My Wake picks up where Ea left off with their last album in 2013, but with a sound that is even more polished and shrouded in an obscure and slightly less melodic aura, including some hints that lead back to Shape Of Despair; the outcome can only be exactly what those who love this genre would always like to hear: bradycardic rhythms and almost imperceptible but constant variations in tone, essential to increase the pathos. Thanks also to Neagoe’s unmistakable growl, the three long tracks drag on mournfully for almost an hour with their essential but always highly effective recipe, with the Obseqvies entrusting the melodic construction work to the keyboards and staging, at the end, a funeral litany that cannot leave indifferent the most sensitive souls. Soloqvam is a song of shattering beauty, with the singing that in the final part becomes a heartbreaking scream, indicative of the fact that the awakening to which the title refers must not have been exactly what was hoped for; Dawning is a relatively harsher track in the beginning but is destined to become more airy with its hints of a monastic type of chant, while Cold is the ideal union between the different ideas offered previously, although these deviations may be almost imperceptible to inexperienced ears. Contrary to a deceptively comforting start, the work of Obseqvies gradually becomes more and more desperate with inexorable and constant slowness; eternal sleep is still the final and safest solution, regardless of how you want to think about it.

2018 – Rain Without End Records