Glasir, from Texas, had already received considerable acclaim at the time of their debut album Unborn, thanks to a personal and heartfelt interpretation of a genre as slippery as instrumental post-rock. Three years later the trio from Dallas returns with New Dark Age, an album that on a conceptual level mercilessly photographs the condition of a humanity mostly unaware of its own insignificance, especially at a time when nature is presenting the bill for all the wrongdoings perpetrated over the last few centuries in the name of progress. The music is then only a panacea that can make more bearable the daily awakening and face an era of ethical darkness that seems to have no outlet; Glasir try to tell us this with three quarters of an hour of liquid post rock, apparently lulling but actually heavily soaked in anxiety and melancholy. The six tracks move along oblique coordinates, where dissonant sounds and shapes emerge (Into the Sun), repeated arpeggios (Holy Chemistry), scenarios close to ambient (Dissolution) and intriguing rhythmic solutions (The Last Firmament) that lead to the fulcrum of the work, the long Black Seas of Eternity, in which Glasir pour all that is allowed in terms of ideas and impulses from their unquestionable compositional talent, followed by the final Hurt Us Again with the violin to make it even more painful in the procession. It’s really difficult to render in such a complete way the conceptual idea behind a musical work without uttering a word: Glasir succeed splendidly, helped by a clarity of intentions that paradoxically makes linear a sound that is anything but simple, and by an artwork that returns the unnatural colours of modern cities, in reality very different from those that our eyes insist on perceiving.

2018 – Elusive Sound

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