The Sadness Of Time Passing represents the ideal codification of the sound of Profetus, subject for the occasion of the umpteenth change to the line-up, due to the return to a completely Finnish line-up with the entry of Katakombi guitarist M. Saarikoski in place of the British Daniel Lowndes. In fact, the title track is the extreme and at the same time the emblem of funeral doom in its purest form, with a desolating keyboard melody that clings along a dilated and slowed down riffing, suspended to the point of unthinkability; the pattern is not that dissimilar to a past track like The Shoreless, the difference being that the emotional impact is amplified to the nth degree by optimal sounds and an intensity that goes hand in hand with Anssi Mäkinen’s stated intention to produce “a concept album about time, mortality, the sense of life’s momentary passage into death, existence and what lies beyond“. After all, if you have to compose an album about the inexorable passing of time, funeral is the genre of choice, the only one able to deform this concept until it becomes a contingent fact in its inevitability and nothing more. If someone asked me to play a handful of songs to introduce him to funeral doom, The Sadness Of Time Passing would be one of them and that Profetus are well aware of the unbearable beauty of this song is clear from the fact that, at the end of the following track Nostalgia, the main theme is resumed, as if to reiterate the concept of transience that goes well with a feeling like nostalgia, different from anger or resignation. Over an hour of music of this kind can only be sustained if interpreted at the height of its poetic drama, an aspect that never wanes until the last note of Tiarnia, at times dreamy but no less painful and enhanced by the ethereal vocals of the talented Anna Carolina of Mourning Sun.

2019 – Avantgarde Music